Interactive Services Detection Java Error

Interactive Services Detection Java Error

Follow me Suddenly, probably after some Java updates were installed, we started to get the Interactive Services Detection message on our screen, As the details suggested the error was for some JRE (Java Runtime Environment) issue, though all the Java dependent applications were working OK on the PC. Still it was quite bugging to get this message Poping on screen repeatedly.   Fortunately troubleshooting this issue was quite simple for us. we followed the following steps 1) Download JavaRA from singular Labs and got the program running.  JavaRa is a tool which helps clean up the dirty install of Java’s from a computer 2) JavaRa detected multiple versions of Java on my PC ie Java7 update 67 (64bit) and Java 7 update 71 (64Bit) 3) Proceed with the wizard to cleanup the Java , the first option was to uninstall it using the original uninstaller, Thankfully that worked fine for me. However I am sure else JavaRa would have cleaned up Java manually for me 4) I uninstalled both the versions of Java from my PC and rebooted it. 5) Post reboot , I went to the Oracle site here to download the latest version of JRE Java 7 update 71 (64Bit) as of now and than installed it successfully on my PC 6) Rebooted the computer and validated my Java dependent applications are doing fine. Hope these instructions help you to fix the issue at hand, for paid support options feel free to reach out to us Here Follow me...

How to Perform a Clean Boot on Windows 8, and Windows 8.1

This article explains the step-by-step procedure to do a clean boot of you Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 OS. This procedure can only be performed by users with Admin rights on the PC. What is Clean Boot Clean boot is a process to disable all Third Party Services and Software, and only using minimal set of Drives and Startup Items. Why Clean Boot your OS Consider a scenario that when you turn your PC on and you you don’t get the PC to work normally. You are not sure on what’s causing the issue. You start your PC in the Safe Mode and all you no longer see that issue. Here is when you are  suggested to perform a clean boot, to troubleshoot or identify issues with your PC. This process disables all third party services and doesn’t start any of the startup item. Hence it helps in understanding the issues. You should first start with clean boot and if that works better for you, then reverse the procedure by enabling the services and startup item one by one and identify what’s causing the issue. How to do a Clean Boot on your Windows 8 or Windows 8.1 Note: Ensure that you are logged in as an Administrator on the PC. Also consider that some functionalities of your PC may not work. Once you reboot your PC normally again, all the functionalities, and errors (if any) will be back as well. 1. Move you Mouse Cursor to the top right corner of the screen, or swipe in from the right edge of the screen (for Touchscreen Monitors) and then tap or...

An authentication error has occurred the local security authority cannot be contacted

Recently we setup a new Terminal server Windows Server 2012 R2 for a client, as a practice we always provide temporary passwords to user and when they login for the first time it prompts them to reset the password. Everything went well from Terminal server configuration to Licensing. However when the users started to login they got a strange error “An authentication error has occurred””The local security authority cannot be contacted” We were troubleshooting the error and realised that if we clear ” Reset pwd at Next login” from users property in Active Directory Users and computers, basically to not force them to reset the password then they are able to login just fine. So we did implement that as a temporary solution but for sure kept looking for the real reason. After some research I figured that Windows 2012 has another level of protection enabled by default when we enable remote desktop, which is Network Level Authentication (NLA). Few words about  Network Level Authentication Network Level Authentication is an authentication method that can be used to enhance RD Session Host server security by requiring that the user be authenticated to the RD Session Host server before a session is created. Network Level Authentication completes user authentication before you establish a remote desktop connection and the logon screen appears. This is a more secure authentication method that can help protect the remote computer from malicious users and malicious software.  Network Level Authentication (NLA) Requirement The client computer must be using an operating system, such as Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP with Service Pack 3, that supports the Credential Security Support Provider (CredSSP) protocol. More About NLA Here...

Unable to Remote Desktop into Windows Server 2012 from OS X

One fine day, suddenly I wasn’t able to RDP into one of our Windows 2012 R2 server, there were repeated authentication prompt, as if I am providing incorrect password.  I asked some one else and he was able to RDP fine into the server. I tried remoting into another Windows 2008R2 server in same subnet and was able to do just fine. The only thing different from usual I was doing, was that today I was using my Mac OS X with its Microsoft Remote Desktop client Version 8.0.9 (Build 25073). So it looks like there was something which wasn’t specifically not letting me RDP. After some research I figured that Windows 2012 has another level of protection enabled by default when we enable remote desktop, which is Network Level Authentication (NLA). Few words about  Network Level Authentication Network Level Authentication is an authentication method that can be used to enhance RD Session Host server security by requiring that the user be authenticated to the RD Session Host server before a session is created. Network Level Authentication completes user authentication before you establish a remote desktop connection and the logon screen appears. This is a more secure authentication method that can help protect the remote computer from malicious users and malicious software.  Network Level Authentication (NLA) Requirement The client computer must be using an operating system, such as Windows 7, Windows Vista, or Windows XP with Service Pack 3, that supports the Credential Security Support Provider (CredSSP) protocol. More About NLA Here How to Fix it  Fortunately the solution to my problem was quite Simple, which is disable the added protection of NLA on the server , here...